Posts with tag "quadcopter"

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Quadcopter. The basics.

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Decided to build a quadcopter? Is it greek for you? Don't know what to start with? This article is right for you. It's based on my own experience.


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H-Quad with FPV

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Hello. By popular demand I'm going to write a post about my FPV H-Quad.

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Car chase with Quad

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Build your first quadcopter

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Hello!
I advise you that you let a quadcopter be your first RC hovercraft. Proper setup of its electronic components guarantees its stable work, while proper soldering and correct choice of controllers/motors ensure high integrity. Quadcopters are universally controllable: resembling a helicopter on the one hand (vertical takeoff and landing, thrust braking), a quad’s movement in the air is in a way more similar to an airplane’s. Finally, quads do not require expensive maintenance and are more crash proof. Just a little background with quads enables you to easily switch to any other hovercraft type.

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ZMR 250 quadcopter. For novices from a novice.

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Now I'm about to assemble my first frame. This topic is quite new and popular. Instead of retelling what you can read online, I’m going to tell you about the innovations, which have been introduced in this design. Also, I would like to recommend all hobbyists from Nizhny Novgorod who have all types of copters in possession, including mini FPV 250, to refer to this new VK.com community: http://vk.com/copter250. Please, join now!
And one more thing: in the end of the post you can read about simulators, which I use.


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Crash-proof quadcopter. The basics of how to avoid major repairs (Pt. 1, Mechanics)

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I've been flying an F450 quad via FPV for about 4 years now. It endured many crashes (free-falls), some were caused by my actions, while some had to do with the work of electronics.


In this article I highlighted a few techniques/rules that will help you prevent serious damages:

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My two-dollar Arduino Nano RC key.

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Hello, everybody! I’m here to present my own RC key, which I connect to the receiver, so that I can control heavy load. I saw different versions on tiny13 and atmega328, and I realized that a Tiny13 would be too low on memory and it could put me through a lot of nickeling and diming; an Atmega328 would cost me almost as much as an Arduino Nano. I also wanted a simple and familiar Arduino IDE, so I’d be able to quickly reflash it via USB.

I decided to make it open source and give other users an opportunity to build and modify it to suit their needs. I chose a two-dollar Arduino Nano microcontroller, the smallest one.

This is how it works:


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